Kitchen Social

We told you ages ago about Yorkshire Food Finder; the company run by the irrepressible Sue and Aidan Nelson, who lead trails around Yorkshire sampling the best produce the county has to offer. Well they’ve expanded. Not only are there more trails: York – with a visit to the wonderful Haxby Bakehouse – the Yorkshire Dales, Thixendale for Ryedale Vinyard and to the Holderness coast with fisherman Andrew Sanderson then on to Justin Staal’s smokehouse.

Sue Nelson’s cookery book collection

They’ve now added ‘Kitchen Socials’ to their repertoire and last week Squidbeak were guests to enjoy one at their Wheldrake home. We sat down to five superior courses, cooked by Sue in her fabulously equipped kitchen surrounded by her extraordinary 1,600+ cookery book library.

Every course, from the gin cured salmon Carpaccio, through to Bridlington lobster, chocolate dessert and a very fine cheeseboard (special mention for Botton cheeses), showcased Yorkshire produce. Just this one dinner made use of 27 different Yorkshire sourced ingredients which they reckoned was a record. Proof if it were needed that the county is a source of great food.

Both trails and dinners would make a gift with a difference or for a group of food loving friends. Yorkshire Food Finder 

 

Star Inn the Harbour

It’s Wednesday lunchtime and chef Andrew Pern is sitting in his whites at a table in his own Star Inn at Harome but there’s no food in sight and the cutlery and napkins have been pushed aside to make way for a large ‘mood board’ of magazine cuttings with ideas for his next big venture.

Rockpool of shellfish with oyster ice cream and seaweed velouté

The Star Inn the Harbour is his latest project. A 160 cover fish restaurant to be housed in the former Tourist Information Centre in the heart of Whitby. The plan is to open in May with a dining area, bar, ice cream parlour and outdoor seating. It’s a plum location in the heart of the town right by the harbour. No wonder the local competition are a little jumpy.

A preliminary menu (which he warns is bound to change) majors on fish and seafood (£5-£15 starters/£15-£22 mains). Naturally they’ll be doing fish and chips: ‘We’d be stupid not to,’ he says, but also Dover sole; monkfish ‘scampi’; halibut and lobster thermidor. On ice: oysters, langoustines, lobster, crevettes then maybe deep fried calamari, fish soup and his fabulous posh prawn cocktail served with a Bloody Mary sorbet.

There will be Rockpool, a Star Inn favourite. He dashes to the kitchen: ‘I’ll get them to make you one’. What comes out is a wooden box filled with pebbles and seaweed: ‘a bit of theatre’ he says and in a hand thrown pot (100 newly commissioned from a local potter) come scallops, prawns, oyster and mussels topped with oyster ice cream and in another pot, a seaweed velouté to pour over.

You will thank me for trying it so that I can confirm it’s absolutely terrific.

It’s also the reason why Pern has a Michelin star and why in January, the Star won Best Gastropub in Britain. Me, I’m counting down to May when the Star rises over the harbour and Andrew Pern, (he was born here) comes home.

Best Gastropub in Britain

 

Congratulations to Andrew Pern and head chef Steve Smith at the Star at Harome for picking up the award for Best Gastropub in Britain. It’s a great achievement and we’re thrilled for them. Good to see the Pipe and Glass in there at number 9 and an amazing showing for Lancashire with no less than 5 gastropubs in the top 50.

Here’s the list:

1 Star Inn at Harome

2 The Sportsman, Whitstable

3 The Pony & Trap, Bristol

4 Freemasons at Wiswell

5 The Coach, Marlow

The List

 

Tenacres Cheese

I bet Gillian Clough didn’t imagine she’d be scooping national prizes for her cheese within a year of start-up; after all she’s got a day job working as a radiographer at Bradford Royal Infirmary.

Together with husband Tim she runs a small holding on the hills above Hebden Bridge where they keep a few rare-breed sheep and eight goats – just for fun, in the beginning. But what started as a hobby became a business when Gillian realised that her beloved Anglo Nubian goats produced incredibly rich milk, perfect for cheese making. She learned the basics at The School of Artisan Food under the tutelage of world-renowned maker Ivan Larcher before embarking on production; she now makes a fresh, creamy cheese unique to the Pennines.

It’s a tricky business – for a start the pasture has to be right, and it took Gillian and Tim a year or so to get the drainage and water supply sorted before the goats could graze on the land. She finally got full approval from Environmental Health in May 2015 and began to make cheese to sell. At the same time she entered her ‘Gat’ (meaning goat in Anglo Saxon) in the British Cheese Awards and won Bronze. In November the same year she won Gold in the Specialists Class at the World Cheese Awards (33 countries represented, 2700 cheeses entered!) It’s an extraordinary achievement, and just goes to show; small can be beautiful AND successful. Oh, and we fell a little bit in love with her sweet, friendly, curious goats (though my jumper now has nibble holes in it ..)

Find Gillian’s cheese at Valley Organics in Hebden Bridge, Czerwick’s Deli in Brighouse and at Andy Swinscoe’s Courtyard Dairy in Settle from March.

 

Prune and Pink Peppercorn Rye Loaf

This recipe is for the serious bakers among Squidbeak readers. It is based on a rye sourdough recipe by Emmanuel Hadjiandreou, the author of the award winning How to Make Bread, published in 2011 by Ryland Peters and Small. Emmanuel gives simple instructions on how to make a rye sour dough which takes 5 days. There after you have some forever if you look after it like a pet.

This loaf is an example of exquisitely flavoured rye sour dough. I was delighted with the result which was a softer, lighter loaf than I had been expecting. The dough requires very little kneading but it does need a long period of fermentation. This bread making project needs to be started a couple of days before the loaf is required and uses a rye sourdough starter.

Makes one small loaf

 

Ingredients

150g dark rye flour

100g rye sourdough starter

200g water

200g dark rye flour

1tsp salt

150g hot water

200g pitted prunes, chopped

1 tbsp pink pepper corns

Method

Grease a loaf tin measuring 21cm x 12cm loaf tin.

In one bowl mix the 150g dark rye flour with the rye sourdough starter and 200g water. Cover the bowl with either another inverted bowl or use a clear plastic shower cap and leave to ferment overnight.

The following day mix 200g of dark rye flour with the salt and tip over the fermented rye sourdough mixture prepared the day before. Pour the hot water over the dry mixture and mix well.

Add the prunes and pink pepper corns and mix thoroughly with a wooden spoon. Transfer the mixture to the prepared loaf tin. Wet a plastic scraper or pallet knife and smooth the surface of the loaf. Dredge the surface of the loaf with rye flour, cover and allow the loaf to rise for two hours.

Keep an eye on the dough to ensure it does not rise over the tin. If it does just wipe any extra dough away from the loaf tin.

Preheat the oven to 220°/425°F/ gas mark 7.

The dough should rise about 2cm during proving after which it should be placed in the oven for about 30 minutes. Check whether the loaf is cooked by turning it out of the tin and knocking the base. If it sounds hollow the loaf is cooked and should be placed on a wire cooling rack to cool.

See more of Joan’s recipes and photographs on www.joanransley.co.uk

Closure of Le Langhe

Le Langhe shopWe were saddened to learn of the sudden closure of Le Langhe, probably our favourite restaurant in York. The shutters are up and it appears to be under new ownership. We know nothing more than what we have read on the website, which says little more than thank you and goodnight. Le Langhe was a crazy, idiosyncratic and superb Italian restaurant and consistently one of our top ten restaurants in Yorkshire. The mercurial Otto cooked like a dream, wonderful understated food from his Le Langhe homeland. We loved this place, the silky pasta, the amazing wine collection we could even handle the erratic service in exchange for such fabulous food. The deli was a wonderful resource and the only place to source white truffles. Thank you Otto for many fabulous meals, we will miss you.

World Class Obsession

If you’ve ever tried to get a table at Michael O’Hare’s Man Behind the Curtain, you will know it’s booked up forever. If you are quick, and prepared to travel out of the county, you might sample his food at a table at the Michelin starred Northcote, near Blackburn.

 

Man_Behind_CurtainObsession began as a week of events to fill the restaurant in the quiet months, now it is what Nigel Haworth calls ‘a monster event’ where 23 world-class chefs cook for a night over 17 nights and each year the line-up gets more amazing.

 

For Obsession 17 there’s O’Hare, Michael Wignal from Gidleigh Park, James Close and John Williams, recently Michelin-starred at the Raby Hunt and Ritz respectively. There’s a woman’s chef night with  Claire Clark, Anna Hansen, Isaac McHale from the Clove Club and Atul Kochhar from Benares.

 

But that’s not all, like us, you may not know leading chefs from Italy, Japan, Australia, Slovenia and China and the USA, but they are some of the world’s best coming to Blackburn to cook. I know it’s crazy.

 

It is a stunning line-up and pricey of course: £130 per person for champagne and canapés followed by five courses – add wine on top of that.

Obsession runs for 17 days from 20 January to 5th February. The hotline opens 8am on 1st November 033 999 7762.

www.northcote.com/obsession

 

Appleton’s of York

Appletons_York_001TSLong before nose to tail eating became fashionable, my granddad, a pork butcher in Burnley, proudly boasted he used every part of the pig. You can see this from the home movie he shot in his factory in the 1950s and my grandma making the hand raised pork pies they supplied at Christmas.

Now, you will find excellent pies at Anthony Sterne’s  new shop, Appleton’s on Lendal in York. You might remember Anthony as the chap who made I’s Pies. Keen meat shoppers will already know about the branches of Appleton’s in Wetherby and Ripon. Now Anthony is bringing pork pies, pork products and fresh pork to York city centre, something not seen since the lovely Scott of York sadly closed in 2008.

On the opening night where we sampled pies and pints,  I talked to farmer David Fieldhouse who until recently was breeding and rearing his rare breed Berkshires and Large Whites at the family farm at Stutton near Tadcaster. Now he has transferred all his pigs to Anthony Sterne’s land near Ripon so that they can be fully outdoor reared.

We liked Appleton’s pies,  especially the ones still warm from the oven and as Appleton’s is virtually on our doorstep, we will be back for sausages, dry cured bacon, ham shanks, gammon and pork joints.

Good to see Appleton’s joining Burr and the newly opened Spring Espresso on Lendal, bringing more good food and drink to this corner of York.

The Etivaz is in

We love Andy Swinscoe’s little cheese shop, the Courtyard Dairy in Settle. And, oh boy … what he doesn’t know about cheese isn’t worth knowing, so when he tells you that the Etivaz is in, it’s time to listen.

Swinscoe_Courtyard_DairyIt might sound like an anagram, but actually Etivaz is an Alpine cheese made on small farms during the summer months between May and October. I bought some last Christmas and can confirm it is superb with a wonderful flavour that suggests something deep and ancient. Andy describes it as a cross between aged Gruyère and Comté, but ‘with an extra depth of flavour from being made over an open fire’.  Watch his film of the Swiss couple making their Etivaz in a chalet up a mountain, right out of a scene from Heidi. And when you’ve seen it, go order your cheese!

 

 

 

 

Fishing Remembered

A rather heart-warming event was held last week at Whitby’s ‘Fisherman’s Wife’ fish and chip restaurant, the one on Khyber pass with the fabulous views over Whitby beach.

The restaurant invited a group of retired fishermen and their wives for a special fish lunch and a chance to share photographs and memories of their days at sea. The guests had between them fishing experience of 500 years. Ronnie Frampton, 83, who fished out of Whitby for over 60 years said: ‘This has been a brilliant day to meet everyone who’s been at sea for a long time. Our fishing days were tough at sea, but it’s in our blood…I’ve had a fantastic time.’

Ronnie Frampton at the Fishermans Wife lunch

Whitby_fisherman

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